Archive for the 'Germany' Category

optimism

November 1, 2011

The Greek Prime Minister wants to hold a referendum on the new bailout deal to be signed with the Europeans. It appears that this was an unexpected move which has caused anger throughout the Eurozone (also here). The details are not yet available, but it seems that Greece will negotiate the rescue plan first, and then will put the proposal to a vote. The Greek people will decide if they agree or not.

To be honest, I thought that this was the best piece of news (for Greece) to come out recently. Negotiations thus far were a two-party game, which has now been forcibly turned into a three-part asymmetric game:

  1. The Greek Government who are on one side of the negotiating table,
  2. The EU, ECB, bankers, IMF, etc. who are on the other side of the negotiating table, and
  3. The Greek people who are voting on the outcome when negotiations are complete.

Now one has to only think: whose negotiating power increased immensely and whose negotiating power took a dive, when the third party entered the game. Yes, it is the Greek government who now drive the process.

Also, it is worth remembering that what Eurocrats fear most is democracy. The history of referenda on EU policies is not stellar, and I suspect that they really don’t want to lose this one. It will not surprise me if Greeks get away with an 80% uniform haircut including the ECB, and bank recapitalisation for free.

Unlike what Greek commentators keep repeating, Greeks have the option to say No: a standard EU policy is to keep having referenda until a Yes vote is won, giving more and more sweeteners in the process.

PS: All is not clear sailing though. A requirement is that the Greek government will maintain its slim majority until January, which is not certain. Another Greek MP resigned today, most probably because of the referendum proposal itself. The opposition leader does not want to hold a trump in his hands, and promises to stop the referendum at all costs.

The chance of Greece descending into a chaotic horde of witch hunters has gone up by another notch.

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consequences of a euro break-up (ubs analysis)

September 6, 2011

UBS economists published today a research piece on a possible breakup of the Eurozone. They contrast feasible solutions like Greece leaving the currency union or Germany doing the same. They also explain why other alternatives (like expelling Greece) are not feasible.

They estimate that Greece leaving the Euro will incur a one-off cost of about EUR10,000 per person during the first year, and about EUR4,000 each year after that. There are obviously severe social costs that cannot be monetized. The one-off figure for the Germans (should they choose to leave instead) is somewhat lower at about EUR8,000.

Contrast that to the cost of bailing out Greece, Portugal and Ireland simultaneously, which is about EUR1,000 for each German taxpayer. It seems clear that the only viable solution at this stage is a default within the Eurozone, even though this could eventually take us to the same point in a few years’ time.

EUR60bn currency shield

September 6, 2011

The crisis in the Eurozone seems to be dragging on and on. The loosers have their heads on the chopping board, but are there any winners? On one hand the slump in Greece is perhaps going to continue for the foreseeable future, while Germany is posting record exports (in the second quarter of 2011) and is set to easily beat the staggering EUR1tr once more this year.

As the Independent shows, Germany’s main trading partners are in the Eurozone, therefore it would not make sense for Germany to initiate the breakup of the common currency. As one can easily see in the chart below, three-quarters of all German exports go to countries within the EU. The article goes even further, blaming Angela Merkel for not making clear to the German people what the benefits are. Could one make the case that this continuing fiasco is actually benefiting the German economy, and that Merkal’s objective should be to keep the circus going?

Breakdown of German exports

In the same chart, one can also notice that this mix seems to be changing: as the crisis intensified in 2010 the share of German exports outside the Eurozone steadily rises and a spike is forming. Overall, there seems to be a relative shift of about 5%. Now one can argue that this is due to the falling demand within Europe, and this can be correct. But other things equal, such an export surge would cause the currency to appreciate, making exports more expensive abroad, negatively affecting demand, and finally bringing back the revenues (as a footnote, the caveat here is the Marshall-Lerner condition). Obviously this currency appreciation has not happened, as the future of the currency itself remains uncertain.

Which brings us to the question: has Germany benefited from the uncertainty surrounding the future of the Euro? and if yes, to what extend? This is not easy to answer, as we do not have access to an alternative universe where the Euro experiment never took place. Peter Brandt uses the Swiss Franc as a proxy of what a Deutschemark would look like, and we take this approach a step further.

Fortunately, European currencies have been moving in step with respect to USD for a while now. We take exchange rates of the old Deutschemark (DEM) and other non-Eurozone currencies from 1971-2000 (British GBP, Swiss CHF, Swedish SEK and Norwegian NOK). Out of these, a regression analysis (in logs) shows the the DEM can be approximated rather well by a mixture of CHF and GBP. We then apply this mixture and impute a fitted DEM exchange for the period after 2000. The results are shown below, with some emphasis on the recent period after the crisis begun.

German exchange rate

German exchange rate (detail)

The fitted DEM explains rather well the movements of the DEM pre-Euro, and of the Euro afterwards, up to the crisis. After that point the two series deviate substantially: the Euro appears weaker by about 10% during 2010, and has weaken even further to over 25% by mid-2011. A freely-floating DEM should have been 25% more expensive in terms of USD, and obviously for a net-exporter like Germany this can have very significant implications.

A back-of-the-envelope calculation goes as follows: Germany exported EUR990bn worth of goods in 2010, and is expected to reach EUR1,150bn in 2011 (EUR550bn was achieved in the first half). We can assume that 25% of these exports went out of the Eurozone, and therefore benefited from the weaker Euro. The size of the benefit depends on the so called ‘export elasticity’, which the EU estimates to be around 0.60 (this means that every 1% depreciation will cause a 0.60% rise in exports). Putting all these together we can estimate that in 2010 the benefit of the crisis for Germany was EUR15bn, which rose to about EUR45bn in 2011. In total, the benefit that the German economy extracted from the ongoing lack of direction amounts to EUR60bn, and keeps rising fast. Perhaps the Greeks should factor this out in their negotiations with the EU, as they are the ones providing this EUR60bn currency shield.

This German advantage cannot continue in perpetuity, and the currency wars are on. Today the Swiss central bank (SNB) have decided to weaken the Swiss franc by pledging to buy foreign currencies at ‘unlimited quantities’. It is perhaps a matter of time for the rest of the advanced economies to step in and restore a more level playing field.